Multilingual Thursday, 13th January

  1. Thanks to Fraser Bewick – thanks, Fraser! – here’s Philip Kerr’s typically forthright take on ELF (English as a Lingua Franca) and translanguaging,  Out with the old, in with the new: ELF and translanguaging https://adaptivelearninginelt.wordpress.com/2021/12/30/out-with-the-old-in-with-the-new-elf-and-translanguaging/ and here’s his previous blog post on Multilingualism, linguanomics and lingualism https://adaptivelearninginelt.wordpress.com/2022/01/12/multilingualism-linguanomics-and-lingualism/

2. So, in the interests of balance, here’s an ELTJ piece by Li Wei on translanguaging, Translanguaging as a political stance: implications for English language education https://academic.oup.com/eltj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/elt/ccab083/6483197?s=09

Several more interesting pieces listed in the sidebar on the right, some of which are also free-access (bravo, ELTJ!):

this one by Francesca Helm is, Exploring English as a ‘glocal language’ in online EMEMUS https://academic.oup.com/eltj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/elt/ccab085/6491227

and this one by Christa van der Walt, Training multilingual English language teachers: challenges for higher education https://academic.oup.com/eltj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/elt/ccab088/6483450

PDFs of all three below – maybe save some for the weekend?

[file x 3]

3. Looking back: if you missed Emma Dafouz’s talk for UCL on English medium education ROADMAPPING for UCL the other day and as a result don’t know what EMEMUS (or ROADMAPPING) are, you can find it here, on the UCL Centre for Applied Linguistics YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxrwOFOP-tU84A6R5SSNsSA

Looking forward: if you’re quick, you can still book for Eowyn Crisfield’s talk for NATESOL on Multilingualism in the Classroom: Productive strategies for supporting teaching and learning at 10:00 UK time this Saturday 15th January https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd0IsENkrKvAFeJzZKVyfcIfcnVKNvjx-Xs0VM06wes4yJSxg/viewform You need to book by 17:00 UK time tomorrow.

4. Thanks to Mark Henebury – thanks, Mark! – here’s A Reading from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales by Jess B. Bessinger Jr, whose Middle English accent lives on twenty-seven years after his death: https://archive.org/details/P_CHA_GEO_01

And here’s a nice legible text of The Canterbury Tales https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43926/the-canterbury-tales-general-prologue

and a bit more on Middle English https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_English

5. And, finally, Joelle Taylor is a major force in UK poetry and she’s just won this year’s T S Eliot Prize.

Here’s her reading three of her poems:

Valentine https://youtu.be/oQ5qGoOJAlQ

Angel https://youtu.be/etSftpvnB5o

and Heaven, 1995 https://youtu.be/IDB4SaVpQ1w

talking about her work https://youtu.be/bxmp0eUl2xU

and her website http://joelletaylor.co.uk/

And one more for luck, a bravura performance-reading by Joelle that I’ve just stumbled over: https://youtu.be/ZXtLqCXSHLI

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s