Wednesday, 27th October

1. The Knowledge and Innovation Exchange (KIX) Europe, Asia, Pacific (EAP) Hub https://www.norrag.org/kix-eap/  invite us to the final day of their 1st KIX Education, Policy and Innovation Conference tomorrow, Thursday 28th October, from 09:00 UK time.

Tomorrow is devoted to Teaching Quality and Learning https://norrag.zohobackstage.eu/KIXEPIC#/agenda?day=4&lang=en and Freda Wolfenden from the UK Open University will be giving the plenary talk.

2. A good long read on Wired of the current Facebook brouhaha, How to Fix Facebook, According to Facebook Employees https://www.wired.com/story/how-to-fix-facebook-according-to-facebook-employees/

I’m not sure ‘brouhaha’ is quite the right word there, though, for something so serious.

3. Brushing your teeth for two minutes has been the international gold standard for a long time now. The evidence base for two minutes, however, is perhaps not as strong as it was https://theconversation.com/is-brushing-your-teeth-for-two-minutes-enough-heres-what-the-evidence-says-169108

But there may well be no evidence base at all to my assertion that two minutes is the international gold standard …

4. Oikophobia does not mean what you might think – if you’re thinking of oiks, that is https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/oik

5. And, finally, a forensic piece by Jane Sunderland from Lancaster University on Gender, language and prejudice: Implicit sexism in the discourse of Boris Johnson https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/opli-2020-0022/html PDF below to ensure that everyone who wants to read this piece can.

“The main part of the article”, says Jane, “takes this further by exploring how certain insults to men draw on an understood prejudice against women. I illustrate this with a “telling case”: three naturally occurring examples of prejudicial, sexist language recently used by British prime minister Boris Johnson: big girl’s blouse, man up and girly swot. For all three to work, they draw on what we might call a discourse of “Women as ineffectual”. I conclude with a discussion of intentionality as regards this sort of prejudicial language use, what it is intended to achieve and how it can be resisted.”

Nothing to do with oiks, strictly speaking – I think.

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